VOTE

Texas voters will have their final change to vote on 10 proposed amendments to the state constitution from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5 at polling places throughout Navarro County.

As reflected on the sample ballot, voters will cast their votes for or against each of the 10 proposed amendments.

The Daily Sun breaks down the proposed amendments:

Texas Proposition 1, the Allowed to Serve as Multiple Municipal Judges Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 1 supports this amendment to allow someone to hold more than one office as an elected or appointed municipal judge in more than one municipality at the same time.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thereby allowing a person to hold more than one office as an appointed, but not an elected, municipal judge in more than one municipality at the same time.

In Texas, a person can serve in more than one municipal judge position, assuming the person was appointed to each of those positions. Some municipalities provide for appointed municipal judges, while other municipalities provide for elected municipal judges in their charters.

As the Texas Constitution restricts elected officials from holding other elected offices, municipal judges for local governments that require elections for the position cannot serve in multiple municipalities.

Proposition 1 would allow someone to hold more than one office as an elected or appointed municipal judge for multiple municipalities at the same time.

Texas Proposition 2, the Water Development Board Bonds Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 2 supports this amendment to allow the Texas Water Development Board to issue bonds on a continuing basis, but not exceeding $200 million in total principal at any time, for water supply and sewer service in areas defined as economically distressed.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thus discontinuing bond funding for the Texas Water Development Board's economically distressed areas program.

The ballot measure would allow the Texas Water Development Board to issue general obligation bonds on a continuing basis, as long as the outstanding principal does not exceed $200 million for the state's Economically Distressed Areas Program.

The ballot measure would require the bonds to be used for developing the water supply and sewer service in areas defined as economically distressed.

Texas Proposition 3, the Temporary Property Tax Exemption for Disaster Areas Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 3 supports this amendment to allow political subdivisions to provide temporary property tax exemptions in areas that the governor declared as disaster areas.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thus continuing to allow property reappraisals following disasters but not tax exemptions.

As of 2019, local governments in Texas have the power to reappraise the value of properties located within a governor-declared disaster area that were damaged in the disaster. Proposition 3 would authorize the state legislature to allow local governments to provide tax exemptions for properties in governor-declared disaster areas.

The state legislature also passed House Bill 492, that will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020 if voters approve Proposition 3. HB 492 would provide rules for when and how a local government can provide an exemption, the types of properties eligible for an exemption, and exemption rates.

Properties that would be eligible include houses used as dwellings, improvements to real property, and tangible personal property used to produce income.

Texas Proposition 4, the Prohibit State Income Tax on Individuals Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 4 supports this amendment to prohibit the state from levying an income tax on individuals.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thus continuing to allow the state to enact a tax on individuals in the future through a statewide referendum.

As of 2019, the Texas State Constitution requires the state legislature to put legislation enacting an income tax before voters as a statewide referendum, which voters could approve or reject. Referring the referendum to voters requires a simple majority vote in each legislative chamber.

Proposition 4 would replace the referendum requirement with a ban on enacting an income tax on individuals. Removing the ban in the future would require a constitutional amendment, which needs a two-thirds vote in each legislative chamber and voter approval.

Texas Proposition 5, the Sales Tax on Sporting Goods Dedicated to Parks, Wildlife, and Historical Agencies Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 5 supports this constitutional amendment to dedicate revenue from the sales tax on sporting goods to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission.

A vote "against" opposes this constitutional amendment, thus allowing the legislature to decide how much of the revenue from the sales tax on sporting goods is allocated to the state Parks and Wildlife Department and the state Historical Commission.

In Texas, the state legislature is allowed to appropriate revenue from the sales tax on sporting goods to the state Parks and Wildlife Department and the state Historical Commission.

Proposition 5 is a constitutional dedication of revenue from the existing sales tax, requiring no new taxes or fees, so that revenue can only be used by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission on public parks and historic sites, and not for any other purposes.

Texas Proposition 6, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute Bonds Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 6 supports this amendment to allow the legislature to increase the maximum amount of bonds for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas from $3 billion to $6 billion.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thereby keeping the maximum amount of bonds for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas at $3 billion.

Proposition 6 would allow the Texas State Legislature to increase the maximum amount of bonds for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas from $3 billion to $6 billion. The state would be limited to issuing $300 million for CPRIT per year.

Texas Proposition 7, the Increase Distributions to School Fund Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 7 supports this amendment to allow the General Land Office and State Board of Education to each transfer $600 million from the Permanent School Fund's lands and properties proceeds to the Available School Fund each year.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thereby keeping the amount of revenue that the General Land Office is permitted to transfer from the Permanent School Fund's lands and properties proceeds to the Available School Fund at $300 million per year and excluding the State Board of Education from making transfers from the fund's lands and properties proceeds.

The Permanent School Fund was created in 1854 for the purpose of investing revenue from state-owned lands, such as leasing mineral rights to oil and gas companies and grazing rights to ranchers.

The Texas General Land Office manages state-owned lands, transferring the revenue from activities on the lands to the State Board of Education, which invests the revenue. Some of the interest revenue, but not the principal, is allocated to the Available School Fund, which then distributes the funding to school districts throughout the state each year.

In 2011, voters approved Proposition 6, which gave the GLO the power to direct up to $300 million in proceeds from activities on state-owned lands to the ASF each year.

Proposition 7 would increase the maximum amount of revenue the GLO can direct to the ASF each year from $300 million to $600 million. The ballot measure would also allow the SBE to direct up to $600 million per year from land-related proceeds.

Texas Proposition 8, the Flood Infrastructure Fund Amendment

A vote "for" Proposition 8 supports this constitutional amendment to create the Flood Infrastructure Fund, which the Texas Water Development Board would use to provide financing for flood drainage, mitigation, and control projects.”

A vote "against" opposes this constitutional amendment to create the Flood Infrastructure Fund.

Proposition 8 would create the Flood Infrastructure Fund. The Texas Water Development Board would be authorized to use the fund for projects related to flood drainage, mitigation, and control.

The Texas State Legislature also passed Senate Bill 7, which would go into effect if voters approve the ballot measure, to implement Proposition 8. SB 7 would provide specifics regarding how the fund can be spent and the process for local governments to receive money from the fund for projects.

Texas Proposition 9, the Precious Metals in Depositories Exempt from Property Tax Amendment

A vote “for” Proposition 9 supports this amendment to allow the legislature to exempt precious metals held in precious metal depositories from property taxation.

A vote "against" opposes this amendment, thereby continuing to permit taxation of precious metals held in precious metal depositories as property.

Proposition 9 would allow the legislature to exempt precious metal held in precious metal depositories from property taxation.

Approval of Proposition 9 would also enact House Bill 2859, the legislation exempting precious metal held in precious metal depositories from property taxation.

Texas Proposition 10, the Transfer of Law Enforcement Animals Amendment

A vote “for” Proposition 10 supports this amendment to allow for the transfer of a law enforcement animal, such as a dog or horse, to the animal's handler or another qualified caretaker if the transfer is in the animal's best interest.

A vote “against” opposes this amendment to allow for the transfer of a law enforcement animal, such as a dog or horse, to the animal's handler or another qualified caretaker if the transfer is in the animal's best interest.

Under the state's Local Government Code, a retiring police dog or working animal is classified as salvage or surplus property and, according to code, surplus or salvage property can be auctioned, donated to a civic or charitable organization, or destroyed.

According to the Texas Senate Research Center, the existing Local Government Code makes transferring a retiring animal to its handler difficult. Proposition 10 would allow agencies to transfer a dog, horse, or another animal to the animal's handler or another qualified person if the transfer is in the animal’s best interest.

On the net:

Navarro County Polling Places:

http://www.co.navarro.tx.us/upload/page/4292/docs/Elections/2019/VR%20NOV%205%202019%20SPECIAL%20ELECTION%20NOTICE%20191016.pdf

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