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The Texas Health and Human Services Commission is providing more than $308 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for the month of December. The allotments are expected to help more than 1.5 million Texas households.

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As part of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Texas Health and Human Services Commission is providing more than $310 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for November. The allotments are expected to help more than 1.5 million Texas households.

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Republic Services, Inc., a leader in the environmental services industry, Monday unveiled its Technical Institute, the industry’s first-ever diesel technician training program. As the need for skilled workers continues to increase, this investment offers best-in-class training, fully compensating students during the 12-week program.

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The Texas Health and Human Services Commission is providing almost $294 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for the month of October as the state continues its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The Texas Health and Human Services Commission is providing approximately $286 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for the month of September as the state continues its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The Texas Health and Human Services Commission is providing approximately $267 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for the month of August as the state continues its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The Texas Health and Human Services Commission will provide around $262 million in emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program food benefits for the month of July as the state continues its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday that the NCAA can't enforce rules limiting education-related benefits — like computers and paid internships — that colleges offer to student athletes.

The high court agreed with a group of former college athletes that NCAA limits on the education-related benefits that colleges can offer athletes who play Division I basketball and football are unenforceable.